[box type=”tick” style=”rounded” border=”full”]Download the Using Apple OS X Lion Server at Home eBook Now

If you’ve been enjoying our Using Apple OS X Lion Server as a Home Server series, then make sure you pick up a copy of the accompanying eBook. You’ll find additional chapters and information on using OS X Lion Server to power your digital home that won’t be available here on the site, and with all of our walkthroughs available in one convenient document (ePub or PDF), it’s far easier to install and configure your server without having to click backward and forwards to the website.

Buy Using OS X Lion Server at Home – £14.99

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[box type=”info” style=”rounded” border=”full”]Articles in this series…

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OK, I know what you’re going to say – in fact, you’ve probably already said it. It’s all very well and good being able to back up my Macs to OS X Server, but hey, what about my PCs? Right at the start of the book, I mentioned that we’d look after you if you had a mixed PC and Mac home network, so let’s talk about backing up your PCs to Lion Server.

You have probably guessed that Time Machine doesn’t support PC backup. If not, let me drop you the news – Time Machine doesn’t support PC backup. That would be too easy, right? So, the most practical way of backing up your PCs to OS X Server is to run a backup program on Windows that can push the backed up files over to your server across the network.

Now, we have a decision to make, and it all hangs on the version of Windows you’re running. Most versions of Windows ship with an onboard backup application which may be fine for your use. Unfortunately, not all versions of Windows allow you to backup to a network device – if you’re running Windows 7 Professional or Ultimate then we’re fine. Windows 7 Home Premium? Unfortunately not. This is a little different to Windows Vista Home Premium which does let you back-up over the network. But, don’t worry, if your version of Windows won’t let you backup over the network, there are other third-party apps which will do. We’ll run through using Windows own backup application as well as an example of a third-party application to cover off both scenarios.

Using Windows Backup

Microsoft’s built-in Backup application may not offer all of the bells and whistles of specialist backup apps, but it does a job and hey, it’s free! (Well, you’ve already paid for it). But before we configure backup, we need to create a location on the server to store our backup files. So, On your server, create a folder somewhere you can remember called PC Backups. As an example, I created mine in my Documents folder – but you can store the files anywhere that’s accessible over the network on your server.

Back to your Windows PC, and you can find the Windows Backup app in Control Panel > System and Security, listed as Backup and Restore. Click the link, and unless you’ve previously setup a backup schedule, you should see the following:

 

To read the rest of this chapter, check out the Using OS X Server at Home eBook.

[box type=”tick” style=”rounded” border=”full”]Download the Using Apple OS X Lion Server at Home eBook Now

If you’ve been enjoying our Using Apple OS X Lion Server as a Home Server series, then make sure you pick up a copy of the accompanying eBook. You’ll find additional chapters and information on using OS X Lion Server to power your digital home that won’t be available here on the site, and with all of our walkthroughs available in one convenient document (ePub or PDF), it’s far easier to install and configure your server without having to click backward and forwards to the website.

Buy Using OS X Lion Server at Home – £14.99

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